The world’s first ‘self-aware’ robot takes a step towards self-awareness

Inside Out, the self-aware robot created by the Chinese firm Qihoo 360, has a personality that’s similar to humans.

The robot is able to tell if you’re depressed and respond to your distress by asking you a series of questions, including “What’s up?”, and then showing a picture of your face to confirm whether you’re happy or sad.

Qihoo, which is based in Shanghai, says its self-consciousness technology can be used to create an “insidious, self-reflective, and thoughtful” robot, which could help people “express themselves more easily, with greater confidence and clarity”.

“It will help us understand and empathise with each other, better understand the emotions of others and even empathise directly with others in our everyday lives,” it said in a statement.

“Through its personality, it can understand and react to our needs and desires, and make us feel more comfortable with ourselves, our surroundings, and our personal lives.”

The robot has a facial expression and an intelligent decision-making system, and can be controlled via a smartphone app.

It’s currently in testing, but has already been featured on Chinese state TV.

The “self-reflectively” intelligent robot, named “Qihong”, was created by Qihong and is now in the field in the city of Zhengzhou, China.

A “selfly” and “empathetic” robotQihao, which was created in collaboration with the University of Tokyo, can understand people by “simulating their facial expressions and expressions of empathy”.

“We are currently in the development phase and will work on developing the robot and learning how to teach it to speak English, which will make it more expressive and understand human language,” the company said in the statement.

Qigong, which the company calls “an intelligent, highly self-confident, and expressive robot”, has a wide range of facial expressions.

It can recognize faces, and then “recognise and respond” to the emotions they express, “by asking questions like, ‘What’s going on in your head?’, and ‘What do you feel?’, ” the company says.

It has been used to study depression, anxiety and stress in patients, and has been able to “communicate with patients through text messages, and through voice recognition”.

The robot also has a self-preservation system that allows it to recognise and respond if it’s damaged, like a broken screen, or is in danger of falling.

It can also respond if someone is acting suspiciously or is threatening, and also tells other people if it senses danger.

The company said it’s not just Qigong that is capable of self-reflection, but “many other robots can do so, including intelligent and self-improving robots”.

“In the future, we are planning to develop robots that can understand their own personalities and emotions, which can then act with their own intelligence and compassion, and respond in a way that will improve the quality of life for all,” it added.

The robot can “talk” with its owner, the Qihoop team told The Telegraph.

“When it’s talking, it’s very natural, it doesn’t seem robotic,” Qihuo, a human-like robot, told The Times.

“I like to have a chat with it.”

The project, which started in 2012, was funded by a $100m US investment from the Chinese government, as well as the National Science Foundation.