Study finds people can ‘feel’ a person’s emotions

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is looking at how the brain uses emotion to manage stress.

It wants to find out if it can detect and process emotion.

The study, published in the journal NeuroImage, was led by Dr. Yair Rosenberg, director of the Cognitive Neurosciences Center at Columbia University Medical Center.

Emotion is a key ingredient in emotional regulation, but it can also be used to control behavior and even feel the emotions.

Rosenberg is looking for whether the brain can use emotion to control stress and to process and manipulate emotion.

Rosenberg and his colleagues have developed a tool called Emotion Impressions, which uses brain waves to help detect and measure the brain’s emotions.

They believe the tool could help people manage their stress better and learn to control their emotions better.

The tool was designed to detect changes in the brain that may indicate when a person is emotionally focused on a particular situation or situation.

In other words, the tool helps people detect when they are experiencing emotion, rather than just noticing it.

Emotional Impression works by comparing brain waves and measuring the intensity of the changes.

The researchers looked at how people’s brains responded to different types of emotional states, including positive, neutral, and negative.

The results showed that people who are emotionally focused and who are more focused on positive emotions tended to have better emotion detection, which meant they were more accurate at identifying the emotional states that caused the emotions, compared to people who were less focused.

In this way, emotional focus could help reduce stress and anxiety, the researchers said.

“The finding that emotional focus is linked to better emotion-detection ability, coupled with the idea that the brain is more capable of recognizing emotional states in the absence of other cues, is potentially very powerful,” Rosenberg said.

The team is currently exploring the ability of emotional focus to be used for different kinds of mental health disorders, including depression and anxiety.

The research was supported by the National Institutes on Aging, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes (NI) Discovery Grant 79934, the American Institute of Physics and Astronomy, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Follow AP Mental Health Writer Sara Goldberg on Twitter at @sbgoldberg.