‘It’s not a game’ – how to deal with your emotions

FourFourSeconds ago, I received a call from a woman in my local bar who had lost her boyfriend of 12 years.

The call was on a Saturday evening, when she was a busy waitress at a popular bar, and she had spent a day out with friends.

I took her into my office, sat her down and asked her what she was going through.

She said: “I’m emotionally blackmailing my boyfriend.”

I knew immediately that it was not a fun experience.

As the conversation went on, I tried to get her to tell me what she felt, but she didn’t feel she had to.

I could tell from her words that she was in pain.

She was crying, her shoulders were slumped, and her eyes were watery.

The next thing I knew, she had been sobbing uncontrollably for hours.

This was not the first time she had tried to control her emotions.

In fact, she has suffered from emotional blackmail syndrome (EHS) for the last 18 years, with a number of other women who have had similar experiences.

After talking to a number women who had been victims of emotional blackmail, I realised I could help them.

I asked them what had happened, what they had done wrong, and what they thought they could do differently.

They told me how their emotions had made it difficult for them to perform their job as a waitress, but how they had been able to do so because they were coping with their emotions.

It wasn’t just about getting them to tell their story, though.

They also said they had found it helpful to share what had been going on in their lives, as a way of making it clear to anyone who might be watching that their lives were not normal.

What to do if you’re in the grip of an emotional blackmail scenario article If you’re feeling desperate or have a friend or family member in need of a break from your emotional turmoil, I urge you to speak to your GP.

You might be in the grips of an EHS.

The symptoms are similar to those that can accompany EHS, and include: emotional exhaustion, mood swings and mood swings that last for a while