How to learn to love yourself after you’ve been emotionally abused

A year after the horrific mass shooting at a Newtown, Connecticut, elementary school, an emotional maturity expert has compiled an emotional resilience checklist for people dealing with emotionally abusive parents.

The “Empowering Your Emotional Life” guide, which includes a checklist of “emotional symptoms” for those who have experienced emotional abuse, also outlines ways to be a better, happier, more resilient person.

The emotional resilience list, published on Thursday by the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Institute for Research on Emotion, also includes an article titled How to be Empowered by the Mind and Body, which advises parents and children on how to manage their emotions in order to be emotionally safe.

“A strong, resilient, and happy family will make you feel loved, cared for, and supported,” the book says.

“When we are in a good place in our lives, we have more power to change the world.”

A strong and resilient family will give you a better chance of living a happier, healthier, and more confident life than you could have if you were living in an abusive situation.

The best way to be able to deal with emotional abuse is to be present, assertive, and positive.

“Emotional resilience is the ability to recognize and deal with emotions, both in the moment and in the long term,” the guide says.

“It is a skill to learn and practice that will help you grow into a better person.”

Emotional wellbeing checklistThe list is based on research published in 2009 that found emotional abuse was associated with lower academic achievement, increased stress, and reduced social and emotional functioning in the child.

According to the report, about 1.5 million children aged 6 to 17 experience at least one form of abuse a year, with an average of three per family.

According a 2011 survey of more than 1,000 adults, 61% of parents reported witnessing physical or emotional abuse at some point in their children’s lives, while 41% reported witnessing abuse involving someone who was related to the child’s family.

About 70% of adults with children in the U.S. have experienced at least some form of child abuse, including more than one parent or sibling.

“We have a lot of good research about child abuse and how to best support children and adults who have suffered emotional trauma,” Dr. Mark Gagnon, an addiction specialist and founder of the Positive Self-Esteem Project, told ABC News.

“The list of symptoms that people have that may be linked to abuse is very broad.

It’s really broad, but it’s not limited to one particular type of abuse.”

In his book, Gagno also offers the following advice for parents and their children: “Be aware that this is a very important time.

It is important that we listen to each other and not just react to each incident.

We must always look at the bigger picture.”

The APA recommends people listen to their own emotions and seek help when needed.

“When a parent or other caregiver is experiencing an emotional crisis, they are often unable to fully process the situation and must take time to reflect on their feelings and feelings of their child,” the APA said in a statement.

The APa also notes that people who are in abusive relationships are more likely to have poor outcomes in school, relationships, employment, and relationships with the law.

“For children, it is not uncommon for their emotions to be triggered or to overwhelm them,” the statement says.

A lot of people don’t realize that they are vulnerable to emotional abuse or that they need to be.

“I have a son and he’s very resilient.

He will not let anything make him cry,” a mother-of-four who asked not to be named told ABCNews.com.

“He’ll let you know when he’s upset.

I try to be his shield and I try not to let him down.”

Follow NBC Asian America on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.