The world’s most influential people are now anonymous, but they’re still the best at keeping their emotions in check

In a study published in Psychology Today, researchers found that when a group of anonymous individuals are asked to identify their most memorable moments from the last few days, most of them will name one of the people who made them feel most emotional.

And as for the emotional intelligence that has helped them manage the chaos of the social web, this study suggests that a lot of people have the same innate sense of empathy.

“A lot of these anonymous individuals that we’re talking about, they’re in the business of sharing their thoughts and their feelings,” said study researcher Jennifer Koss, a psychology professor at the University of California, San Francisco.

“And they’re the ones that are most susceptible to social manipulation, so that’s why we’re seeing them fall prey to it.

We think the people that fall prey most often are the ones who feel the most threatened.”

The study also found that, as people age, they tend to become more aware of the emotional state of others and less attuned to it in themselves.

“They get to see the emotional states of others, and they can’t help but notice it,” said Koss.

“So when we say that we feel a lot less vulnerable now that we’ve passed the time, it’s because we’ve become less attune to others emotions and less aware of their emotional state.”

The researchers used a similar study to study the emotional responses of college students.

“These young adults were asked to name their most significant events in their lives, and then they were asked how they felt about each of those events,” Koss said.

“What they found is that, on average, students who were anonymous and were more vulnerable were the ones with more negative emotions about their own lives and more negative reactions to other people’s lives.”

The findings may be the start of a new wave of research that may one day help us all manage our emotions more effectively.