How to handle emotional difficulty in a relationship

It’s hard to explain how difficult it is to communicate emotions to a person you love.

But a new study suggests it can be hard for women to cope with their own emotions, especially those that arise during periods of intense conflict or trauma.

The research, led by Dr. Pamela Hutchinson, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, examined emotional distress among women in relationships that had been impacted by the death of a loved one.

“The results are disturbing,” Hutchinson said.

The researchers surveyed 2,200 women in the United States who were in committed relationships at the time of the study. “

They are feeling emotionally unavailable and powerless in a way that is often very difficult to communicate and process.”

The researchers surveyed 2,200 women in the United States who were in committed relationships at the time of the study.

About 60% of them said they experienced some form of emotional difficulty during their relationship, including anxiety, grief, fear, sadness, anger, and guilt.

The other 30% of women said they did not experience any emotional difficulty at all.

While the study found that women who experienced some type of emotional stress experienced emotional difficulty more often than those who did not, the research is not conclusive.

“It is possible that there are a few women in this group that were more vulnerable to emotional difficulty than others,” Hutchison said.

What are some coping strategies?

Some women are better able to handle some emotional difficulties when dealing with trauma.

For example, women who are victims of sexual assault are often more able to cope emotionally and cope with it.

“We know that sexual assault can lead to psychological distress, anxiety, depression, and feelings of emptiness, so for these women, the emotional impact of this assault can be significant,” Hutchins study said.

Another coping strategy is to become more comfortable with your emotions and to try to “become a good listener.”

“There is a lot of literature on listening skills, which is something that can be a challenge for many women,” Hutchin said.

To find out if women are able to better cope with emotional distress, Hutchinson and her colleagues studied a large sample of 2,000 women who were randomly assigned to one of two groups.

One group was told to listen more to a partner, while the other group was given a task to perform in the future that would increase their relationship stability.

“Our study was designed to examine how emotional difficulties relate to the ability to cope in stressful situations,” Hutchion said.

The researchers found that emotional difficulty did not affect women’s ability to manage emotional distress when dealing specifically with a partner.

For instance, the study participants who were given the task of listening to a potential romantic partner reported more positive emotions in the short term than the group who had the task with a romantic partner.

The women who had a romantic relationship reported greater emotional distress in the relationship.

“So, in general, women in relationship conflict seem to be able to manage emotions better when dealing exclusively with a potential partner,” Hutchions study concluded.

The study was published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

For more on relationships, see The Psychology of Dating.

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Contact Ashley F. Johnson at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter: @ashleyjohnson.