Why do people cry? It’s because they’re afraid of being sad, psychologists say

A new study finds people cry more than they think they should, and that this emotion is triggered by fear.

The findings, published Monday in the journal PLoS ONE, shed light on how people experience emotional states.

“We’ve been interested in the mechanisms of emotion for a long time,” study co-author James D. Fink, a doctoral student in psychology at Harvard University, told The Associated Press.

“So we wanted to know if people could tell the difference between emotional and non-emotional states.

And we found that the neural systems involved in emotion are very different from the mechanisms involved in non-elevated arousal.”

Emotional states have been linked to emotional states that are less stable.

For example, when a person is feeling sad, the brain changes to the part that releases dopamine, a chemical associated with emotional states, according to the journal Nature Neuroscience.

People often believe that being depressed is the same as feeling sad.

This is incorrect, according a new study published Monday.

Emotional feelings can be triggered by many different triggers, including trauma, social rejection, and a person’s own emotions.

“It’s not only the experience of pain or suffering that triggers emotions,” Fink said.

“The brain uses the same system as it uses for other states.”

The study found that emotional states were activated when people were exposed to two different kinds of stimuli, either positive or negative.

They were also activated when they viewed the image of a happy face, which elicited a higher heart rate.

“The way we perceive emotion is a very complex system,” Finks said.

“I think what makes emotions so complex is that they’re triggered by so many different things that are going on at the same time, but there are two things that we’re interested in.

One is the level of emotion and the other is the intensity of emotion.

When the intensity is high, we perceive that the person is angry or sad, and when it’s low, we don’t.”

The researchers also found that people who were emotionally scared were more likely to cry than people who experienced low emotional states during the experiment.

“If you are in fear, you’re less likely to be able to see an angry face, so you’re more likely than people in the control group to cry,” Finkle said.

The research is the latest in a long line of research that has linked fear and sadness to emotional responses.

For instance, in a study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 2009, researchers found that fearful people reported more distress when they were unable to see the fearful faces on a computer screen than when they saw them in person.

In another study, in 2012, researchers reported that fearful participants were more anxious when they felt they were being watched than when the study subjects were able to observe the situation without being physically observed.

In another study published last year, Fink and his colleagues found that depressed people were more than twice as likely to show signs of emotional distress in their tears.

“In some respects, people with depression are like people with anxiety, in that they have a lot of these negative feelings,” Fisk said.

They also report that depressed and anxious people tend to have a higher risk of developing a mood disorder.

This may be related to increased levels of cortisol, which increases blood pressure and blood sugar levels in people with mood disorders.

Fink and others have also found evidence that people with high levels of anxiety tend to be more likely for the brain to be activated when their emotions are low, as opposed to when they are not.

This suggests that people are more sensitive to low emotional levels and less likely than others to be triggered when their emotional states are low.

“When someone is afraid, they have less of an ability to feel calm,” Fick said.

That may explain why the study participants were so anxious and that the researchers could not find the emotional states they experienced during the tests.”But we don